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From left, outgoing Sanibel-Captiva Chamber of Commerce Chair Fran Peters, Business Person of the Year Craig Albert and Chamber President Ric Base. Chamber of Commerce photo
From left, outgoing Sanibel-Captiva Chamber of Commerce Chair Fran Peters, Business Person of the Year Craig Albert and Chamber President Ric Base. Chamber of Commerce photo
Wednesday, May 13, 2015 9:03 AM

The Sanibel & Captiva Islands Chamber of Commerce recently honored Craig Albert, president and CEO of Sanibel Captiva Community Bank, as Business Person of the Year.

  • SWEET SHOTS: The Common Gallinule
    Thursday, May 09, 2019 6:00 AM

    The Common Gallinule is common throughout marshes in both North and South America. Formerly it was referred to as the Common Moorhen, but in 2011 the American Ornithologists Union voted to split the American population of the bird into it's own seperate species, the Common Gallinule. The Common Gallinule and its relative, the Common Moorhen ( elsewhere in the world ) are the most commonly seen members of the Rail family around much of the world.

  • SWEET SHOTS: The Limpkin
    Thursday, May 02, 2019 7:00 AM

    The Limpkin is found throughout Florida in freshwater marshes, along the shores of ponds and lakes and in wooded swamps. It's range, it's habitat and distribution are dictated by the presence of it's preferred prey, the Apple Snail.

  • SWEET SHOTS: Double-Crested Cormorant
    Thursday, April 25, 2019 7:00 AM

    The Double-crested Cormorant, a long-lived water bird, inhabits coasts, bays, lakes and rivers across the entire United States. This very adaptable long-bodied diving bird is found in almost any aquatic habitat and even nests in trees near or over the water, on sea cliffs, or on ground on islands. Never being too far from the water, the Cormorant is a popular sight on Sanibel and Captiva, often seen in colonies with their slender necks outstretched and their wings half-spread to dry. The Double-crested Cormorant as well as other Cormorant species do have glands that provide waterproofing of their feathers but all too often these are insufficient so they must allow their wet feathers to dry before taking flight.

  • SWEET SHOTS: Black Skimmer
    Saturday, April 20, 2019 3:34 PM

    A recent trip through Redfish Pass (between Captiva and North Captiva) gave me a great chance to see a large group of Black Skimmers, which I hadn't seen in years. The skimmer photographed here was actually captured on a golf course lake at The Sanctuary a few years ago. The large group of Skimmers we encountered recently were resting on a sandbar where they are often seen this time of the year as well as on many of our local beaches.

     

  • Sanibel School Holds 26th Annual Seahorse Festival
    Saturday, March 30, 2019 1:02 PM

    The Sanibel School held its 26th annual Seahorse Festival on Saturday, March 30 at the Sanibel Community Park. Organized by the school’s Parent Teacher Association as a fundraiser, the event had live entertainment, food trucks, auction items and a kids zone with activities, rides and inflatables. Proceeds help purchase workbooks, fund field trips, educational programs, the STEM program, and the robotics program, among others.

  • SWEET SHOTS FROM THE SANCTUARY GC: Gaillardia
    Wednesday, January 30, 2019 7:00 AM

    Gaillardia, also known as Blanket Flower, is a native perennial that blooms throughout the summer and well into the fall. Often, it can be seen blooming year round in bright sun areas that are protected from our cool northern winds.

  • SWEET SHOTS FROM SANCTUARY GC: Great Crested Flycatcher
    Thursday, January 24, 2019 7:00 AM

    The Great-crested Flycatcher is a cavity nester that is often more easily heard than seen, with rolling calls echoing through the woods. It's often found in more open wooded areas and around the edges of clearings. This member of the Tyrant Flycatcher family can be found year-round in Southern Florida.

  • SWEETS SHOTS FROM SANCTUARY GC: Snowy Egret
    Tuesday, January 15, 2019 9:47 AM

    The Snowy Egret is a beautiful, small, graceful egret known for it's contrasting yellow feet. Following great reductions in numbers in the early 1900's due to the plume trade, protection of the bird brought back the population and it is now more widespread and common than ever.

  • SWEET SHOTS FROM THE SANCTUARY GC: Black Racer
    Friday, January 04, 2019 4:59 PM

    The Black Racer, also known as the Southern Black Racer, is a common species of snake found all around the southern regions of the United States. They are non-venomous and are basically timid by nature and virtually harmless, if not attacked or threatened. During the winter months, they often bask in the sunshine in open spaces, including warm asphalt roads, and are much more visible than in the warmer summer months.

  • SWEET SHOTS FROM THE SANCTUARY GC: American Kestrel
    Friday, December 21, 2018 3:01 PM

    The American Kestrel is the smallest bird in the Falcon family and is also the most familiar and widespread in North America. They perch high along a treeline or often on a roadside wire and with their excellent vision wait to pounce on any one of a wide variety of prey including grasshoppers, mice, lizards, frogs, beetles and caterpillars. If there's not a suitable perch, the Kestrel can easily hover over an open area and swoop down for a catch.

  • SWEET SHOTS FROM THE SANCTUARY GC: Bald Eagle
    Friday, December 14, 2018 9:39 AM

    The Bald Eagle, the emblem bird of the United States, is soaring above the islands this time of the year. Many Bald Eagles in the south, especially along the coast, are permanent residents but the influx to Southwest Florida is still apparent from birds traveling south from as far as Canada for the Winter season.

  • SWEET SHOTS FROM THE SANCTUARY GC: Red Shouldered Hawk
    Friday, November 30, 2018 9:26 AM

    The Red-shouldered Hawk is seen and often heard all around Sanibel and Captiva throughout the entire year. This mid-size hawk lives throughout the pine woods in the interior parts of Florida and easily adapts to perching amongst the buttonwoods and mangroves along the coast.

  • SWEET SHOTS FROM THE SANCTUARY GC: White Pelican
    Friday, November 23, 2018 1:00 PM

    The White Pelican, one of the largest birds in North American, can have a wingspan of up to nine feet. With fall upon us here in Southwest Florida, this large bird is one to keep an eye out for with it's bright white breast and black outlined wings often circling in unison high above the Southwest Florida coastline, where the White Pelican calls home for the winter months. If not high in the sky, the White Pelican can be seen in large flocks resting on a sand bar or oyster mound in the back bays of Sanibel, Captiva and North Captiva.

  • SWEET SHOTS FROM THE SANCTUARY GC: Raccoon
    Friday, November 16, 2018 1:00 PM

    Florida raccoons are common throughout the entire state of Florida and are typically smaller than those farther north. The word " Raccoon " is derived from " Arakun ", an Algonquin word meaning " he scratches with his hands". This originates from the fact that raccoons possess a far greater manual dexterity than other small mammals and have a highly developed sense of touch. Their paws are comprised of what looks to be slender fingers that provide for great climbing capabilities as they flee from danger or climb for food such as the seeds of our state tree, the Cabbage Palm.

  • SWEET SHOTS FROM THE SANCTUARY GC: Reddish Egret
    Friday, October 26, 2018 4:33 PM

    The Reddish Egret, a conspicuously long-legged and long-necked wading bird of coastal regions, is more tied to salt water than other of our other Herons or Egrets. It is known for its erratic dancing when it forages and is a species of special concern. There are only 3,500 pairs of reddish egrets worldwide, with nearly 10 percent of that population in Florida, where it can reside year-round. This egret is also a year-round resident along the eastern coast of Texas, where the majority of the breeding for the Reddish Egret takes place.

  • SWEET SHOTS FROM THE SANCTUARY GC: Royal Tern
    Friday, October 19, 2018 3:57 PM

    The Royal Tern is common along tropical and subtropical shores of the world throughout the entire year, favoring protected warm coastal waters, as in bays, lagoons and estuaries. Habitats throughout Southwest Florida provide ample areas for this bird and plenty of viewing opportunities.

  • SWEET SHOTS FROM THE SANCTUARY GC: Florida Soft Shell Turtle
    Friday, September 28, 2018 12:25 PM

    The Florida Softshell Turtle is a species of American Freshwater Turtles, a native of the Southeastern United States and one of the 26 species of turtles found in Florida . It is found all around the islands of Sanibel and Captiva. They prefer slow-moving fresh water bodies that have sand or mud bottoms but will utilize brackish water, often near the mouths of small rivers or streams. They are large turtles, with the adult females being up to 24" in length, twicw that of an adult male. Softshell Turtles can weigh up to 40 pounds and if one of these mistakes your bait / lure for it's next meal, you are in for quite a fight.

  • SWEET SHOTS FROM THE SANCTUARY GC: Gulf Fritillary
    Friday, September 14, 2018 3:32 PM

    The Gulf Fritillary is a brightly colored butterfly common across the extreme southern portions of the United States. It is found in all 67 counties in Florida and is a regular inmost butterfly gardens, including those in urban settings. This butterfly does migrate throughout the Southeastern United States with adults moving to the northern limits in the spring and migrating back south throughout the state of Florida in late summer and fall.

  • SWEET SHOTS FROM THE SANCTUARY GC: Red Bellied Woodpecker
    Saturday, September 01, 2018 12:10 PM

    The Red-Bellied Woodpecker is one of the more common birds you'll find around the area. It's range is all throughout the Southeastern United States and prefers swamp and riverside wooded habitats. It feeds on insects, berries and nuts and sometimes catches flying insects as well.

  • SWEET SHOTS FROM THE SANCTUARY GC: Zebra Butterfly
    Saturday, August 25, 2018 12:55 PM

    Since 1996, the Zebra Longwing Butterfly has been classified as the state butterfly of Florida. It's easily identified by it's long, narrow wings that are black with light yellow zebra-like stripes. It flourishes in damp, tropical areas and is typically found in hammocks and thickets. Due to this habitat preference, south Florida is the most common area in the state to find this butterfly. The passion vine / passion flower is the host plant to the Zebra Longwing. The host plant is the plant that the larvae ( caterpillar ) feeds on. The larvae of the Zebra Longwing have white bodies and long black spines and a yellow head. Several larvae will hatch from eggs laid on the underside of a leaf and these veracious caterpillars will continuously eat, grow quickly and if conditions are right can go from egg to butterfly in just a little over three weeks.

     

    The Zebra Longwing can be seen all around the islands. Native passion vine is throughout the island, providing the needed host plant for generation after generation of this butterfly.

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